2017 Historic Preservation Awards

Quilcene Quaker Church

Quilcene Friends Church

The Quilcene Friends (Quaker) Church was built in 1909 by the local Quilcene-Leland Assembly members using local cedar and douglas fir lumber. It was built with electrical power but did not have a plumbing system. A woodstove with a brick chimney was added soon after completion, most likely to provide some warmth for the congregation.

This Church served the Quakers into the 1960s. It was used by Sister Bertha as a meeting house until the growing congregation moved into the larger, nearby theater. The Church was then converted to a residence with six small interior rooms and a concrete block bathroom addition to the building. The Church's apse served as the kitchen area.

The structure was derelict when Anne Ricker and Scott Abbott acquired it in the early 1990s. The church roof had partially collapsed, all windows were broken and the west portion of the floor was rotted through. Some of the wainscoting was salvaged and reused in the new interior. The bathroom addition was removed.
After twenty years' work, the church now stands exactly where it was built. The windows are a faithful reproduction of the original. The steeple has been stabilized and the floor has been leveled and repaired. A new engineered roof now replaces the original, collapsed roof. The entire building has been strengthened to be earthquake resistant. The building has been re-sided and is as close to the original as could be accomplished. This rehabilitated space now serves as Anne Ricker’s studio and Q Gardens Learning Space.

The respect that Ann and Scott have shown this building demonstrates a strong commitment to historic rehabilitation. This work has been constrained by available budget, and remains a labor of love. This building is a valued part of Quilcene’s historic fabric.

This year, four awards were presented.

Steve Chapin received an award for carrying on a historic tradition. Chapin makes Pocock racing shells, featured in the book "The Boys in the Boat" by Daniel James Brown, which details the triumph of the University of Washington men's rowing team in the 1936 Olympics .Chapin is not only canying on a tradition, but also passing on the skills to others in his Point Hudson workshop.

Peninsula College won an award for adaptive use in its restoration of Fort Worden Building 202. The exterior looks exactly the same, while the interior has been adapted for college classes.The restoration will keep that building useful for another 100 years.

The Nordland General Store won the award 30 years ago, and again this year for its unchanging place in the community.



2016 Historic Preservation Awards

The Jefferson County Historical Society presented four historic preservation awards at its August Board of Trustees meeting. The 2016 awards were given to projects undertaken or substantially completed in 2015. The awards have been presented annually since 1978 and are selected each year from county-wide nominations. A committee of JCHS trustees, staff, and community members tour the nominated sites and interview owners about their projects during the decision process.

Chair of the Awards Committee Chris Prescott said, “Awards may be for restoration of historic structures as well as programs and individuals who help preserve the history of Jefferson County. All of the 2016 awards went to historic sites.

Awards were presented to:

Todd and Kathleen Knoblock for restoration of the 1879 John E. Fuge House, 1609 Washington Street, Port Townsend. The Fuge House had significant work done to the foundation and on the interior. Plaster was in disrepair, corbels and arches missing and original faux grained woodwork was damaged. Recipes for making plaster with original ingredients including livestock hair enabled restoration of walls and ceilings. Corbels and arches were re-created with molds made on site. Faux wood graining was mastered by Todd and applied throughout.

Star of the Sea

Michael and Cora Loviz for restoration of the 1888 Star of the Sea Rectory, 830 Franklin Street, Port Townsend. It was the rectory for St. Mary Star of the Sea Catholic Church (1882-1928). The rectory has undergone substantial structural improvements including new concrete foundation, new plumbing, electrical and heating system. Solar panels have been added discretely. A replica of the old church in the form of a chicken coop graces the side yard.

Church inspired chicken coop

David and Elizabeth Holland for the restoration of the 1900 Dr. Jacob C. House House, 336 Filmore Street, Port Townsend. The 4,500 square foot Queen Anne Victorian has undergone significant renovation including raising the basement and installing a new heating system. The home possesses many attractive period features throughout including a number of stained glass windows that were once owned by actor Vincent Price.

Finnriver Orchard for the restoration, rehabilitation and adaptive use of the Bishop-Brown Farm, 124 Center Road, Chimacum. The owners of Finnriver Orchard have creatively renovated and repurposed the historic Bishop-Brown farm for (in their words) “the love of land, the art of farming, and the spirit of community,” maintaining the structures and land as vital elements of Jefferson County’s the rural agricultural community.



James B. Hogg House

The James B. Hogg House

2015 Historic Preservation Awards

The Jefferson County Historical Society presented a total of eight historic preservation awards for 2015: one Mary P. Johnson Award and seven Certificates of Appreciation. The awards have been presented annually since 1978 and are selected each year from county-wide nominations. They include awards for restoration of historic structures as well as programs, projects and individuals that help preserve the history of Jefferson County. Awards were presented on May 6 at at the Quimper Grange Hall, 1219 Corona Street, Port Townsend.

Certificates of Appreciation were presented to:

• Scott and Linda Spurgeon for ongoing stewardship of the James B. Hogg House, 932 Pierce Street, Port Townsend
• Port Townsend Masonic Lodge No. 6 for ongoing stewardship of the Port Townsend Masonic Center, 1333 Jefferson Street, Port Townsend
• Soundview Cemetery for ongoing stewardship of an important Marrowstone Island heritage site
• Jeff Monroe for moving the Enchanted Valley Chalet away from the Quinault river and saving it from imminent destruction
• Darrell Conder for researching and writing Meet me at the Bus Stop, 125 years of Public Transportation in Jefferson County, 1889-1925
• Jacilee Wray for researching and writing River Near the Sea: An Ethnohistory of the Queets River Valley
• Quimper Grange #720 for ongoing stewardship of the Quimper Grange Hall, Port Townsend

Landes House

The 2015 Mary P. Johnson Award was presented to Craig Britton and Carleen Bruins for restoration work on the Landes House in Port Townsend. The Landes House, 1934 Franklin Street, incorporates the 1871 Dennison House and later 1881-1883 construction by Colonel Henry Landes into one structure.


2014 Historic Preservation Awards

The Jefferson County Historical Society presented a total of eight historic preservation awards for 2014: two Mary Johnson Awards and six Certificates of Appreciation. The awards have been presented annually since 1978 and are selected each year from county-wide nominations. They include awards for restoration of historic structures as well as programs and individuals who help preserve the history of Jefferson County. Five awards were presented at the American Legion Hall on May 19. Three awards were previously presented during a ceremony at the Quilcene Historical Museum on May 5.

Chair of the Awards Committee Chris Prescott said, “The Mary Johnson Award is the society’s highest honor and is given to projects that meet the strict guidelines of the Secretary of Interior Standards for Historic Preservation. It is not presented every year.” 2014 Mary Johnson Awards were presented to the Eisenbeis Building and to Grace House.

The Eisenbeis Building, 830 Water Street, was constructed by Port Townsend’s first mayor Charles Eisenbeis. The original portion of the building was constructed of stone in 1873. It has housed a clothing store, hotel, movie theater and hardware store. The striking building has undergone extensive renovation and restoration in recent years and has been converted into residential and commercial condominiums. The current owner, Port Townsend Associates LLC, has been responsible for the completion of the signature bay window façade. Previous owners Ritch Sorgen and Marlies Egberding performed extensive improvements, especially to the interior. The Eisenbeis Building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.

Grace House, constructed by James Stockand in 1887 is located at 110 F Street in Port Townsend. Current owners Michael and Molly Klupfell purchased the home in 2001 and have performed extensive renovations and restorations. The exterior has been repainted using seven colors and 70 gallons of paint. A new roof was installed and the brick chimneys were rebuilt. The interior has also undergone a thorough restoration with special attention to Victorian period details.

Certificates of Appreciation were given to Don Ward for maintaining the Quilcene Cemetery, Sandra McDermott for protecting and maintaining the Webster House in Port Townsend, Nancy McDaniel for her book Sound Defense, and American Legion Marvin G. Shields Memorial Post #26 for ongoing maintenance and upgrading of the Legion Hall. Two Certificates of Appreciation were given to the Quilcene Historical Museum for its Oral History Project and for the purchase of the Hamilton-Worthington House.